Prevention of relapse/recurrence in major depression by mindfulness-based cognitive therapy by John D. Teasdale, Zindel V. Segal, J. Mark G. and Williams,Valerie A. Ridgeway, article 4/13 (Ellie)

This study evaluated mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, a group intervention designed to train recovered recurrently depressed patients to disengage from dysphoria-activated depressogenic thinking that may mediate relapse.

“studies of lifetime course of depression, a recent commentary concluded that “it has been established that unipolar major depressive disorder is a chronic, lifelong illness, the risk for repeated episodes exceeds 80%, patients will experience an average of 4 lifetime major depressive episodes of 20 weeks duration each”

Teasdale, J. (2000). Prevention of Relapse/Recurrence in Major Depression by Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy. Prevention of Relapse/Recurrence in Major Depression by Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy, 615-623. doi:journal of counseling and clinical therapy p.2

The method here is a combination of pharmecutal treatment as well as physcological interventions as well (practicing mindfulness.)

There researchers reported use of approaching the treatment of severe depression by combining treatment by antidepressant medication with provision of CBT, following their recovery, while the m medication is gradually going down in dosage. The results of the trial were described by comparing the long-term outcome of 40 patients with recurring depression.


(three or more episodes) successfully treated with antidepressant medication and then randomized to clinical management or a combination of (a) CBT for residual symptoms, (b) lifestyle modification, and (c) well-being therapy, while antidepressant medication was withdrawn. Over a 2-year follow-up, the CBT group showed significantly less relapse/recurrence (25%) than the clinical management group (80%).

Teasdale, J. (2000). Prevention of Relapse/Recurrence in Major Depression by Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy. Prevention of Relapse/Recurrence in Major Depression by Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy, 615-623. doi:journal of counseling and clinical therapy, p.2

So the evidence goes to show, that practicing mindfulness improves ones mindset, even if they are prone to bad mental health. It is important to note here however, that the usage of pharmaceuticals influenced this experiment greatly, not to say mindfulness isn’t a contributing factor, but it can’t account for all the improvement among these patients.

Studies comparing the long-term outcome of patients who recovered following treatment of acute depression by CBT with the
outcome of patients who recovered following treatment with antidepressant medication and who were then withdrawn from medication have consistently found less relapse or need for further
treatment

The strategy of combining acute pharmacotherapy with psychological prophylaxis offers the possibility of (a) capitalizing on the
cost-efficiency of antidepressant medication to reduce acute symptomatology while (b) avoiding the need for patients to remain
indefinitely on maintenance medication to reduce future relapse
and recurrence.

Williams, M. (2000). Prevention of Relapse/Recurrence in Major Depression by Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy. Prevention of Relapse/Recurrence in Major Depression by Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy, 615-623. doi:journal of counseling and clinical therapy

It it obvious that MBCT is a successful form of therapy based off the many studies and experiments conducted. It should be a bigger concern as to why this type of practice isn’t pushed more in the medical world.

Teasdale, J., Williams, M., Segal, Z., Ridgeway, V., Soulsby, J., & Lau, M. (2000). Prevention of Relapse/Recurrence in Major Depression by Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy. Prevention of Relapse/Recurrence in Major Depression by Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy, 615-623. doi:journal of counseling and clinical therapy

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